Women’s Health and Family Planning Association of Texas

“A translator who can help me navigate the numbers…”

The Women’s Health and Family Planning Association of Texas was founded in 1977 to offer all Texans
equal access to high-quality reproductive healthcare and control over the timing and spacing of their
children. In 2013, WHFPT’s role as an association of local member agencies became more complex when
it became the sole grantee in Texas for the federal Title X Family Planning Services grants, providing
reproductive healthcare to low-income and uninsured individuals. WHFPT now had to distribute Title X
funds to clinics throughout the Lone Star State and provide training, technical assistance, program
evaluation, quality assurance, and grants management for sub-recipient agencies. This network of 28
public health, nonprofit, university, and Planned Parenthood agencies operate 94 family planning clinics
serving 200,000 clients, the overwhelming majority of whom are uninsured and living below federal
poverty levels. Meanwhile, the organization was undergoing dramatic growth while contending with
such challenges as government funding levels that remained flat, the Zika virus outbreak, and Hurricane
Harvey.
Kami Geoffray, JD, was named CEO in 2016 after several years of advancing women’s health policy at
the state government level. “I’ve been writing and administering grants for most of my professional life
but being responsible for an organization’s overall budget was new to me,” she says from her office in
Austin. She quickly discovered that WHFPT had two distinct financial needs: oversight of the
organization’s internal operations, including the $14 million Title X grant, $12 million of which gets
passed through to the network of sub-recipients; and oversight of those sub-recipients’ programs to
ensure that they are billing appropriately and getting reimbursed for their services.
“We were never going to find a CFO with the skills to do both. Our programmatic staff could look after
the sub-recipients, but I needed someone who was truly a financial whiz, but who didn’t need to be in
here all the time,” she recalls.
Geoffray was referred to Your Part-Time Controller by a Title X grantee in Philadelphia. Associate Vivien
Chang, who was relocating to San Antonio, was assigned to work with WHFPT, and Geoffray couldn’t be
happier.
“It’s a great fit. Vivien comes in here once every two weeks, and works remotely at other times. She’s
helped us get our financial systems ready for our annual audit and has created a package of monthly
reports that’s current. She’s helped us get our finances streamlined to keep my board informed and help
them with their financial oversight.
“I have no accounting experience,” she admits. “It’s been great to have Vivien as a translator who can
help me navigate the numbers within my time constraints. We’ve been able to do so much even without
a lot of face-to- face time. I lucked out!”

Chang had to get up to speed quickly, looking at the five-year history of the Title X grant and
understanding it. “Our accounting is complex. I’ve been in women’s health in Texas for years and it’s
taken me awhile. What Vivien has set up has been easier. I feel confident that even though Vivien had
not worked on this grant previously, she has a wealth of knowledge and experience and a support
network of her YPTC colleagues who can help her with whatever she needs,” Geoffray adds.
Given the current political climate, the future of funding for women’s reproductive health is always of
concern, and Chang is helping WHFPT plan for the potential of tracking multiple funding streams in the
future. By costing out staff time and overhead expenses, the organization is preparing itself for a more
diversified funding portfolio, being audit-ready, and addressing sustainability should major changes
become necessary.
“I’m glad to have a partner who has helped me make our finances easier and still be compliant. It’s great
to have a partner like that as we’re moving through this space. It’s been a godsend!”